Need a version of this with nurses be-bopping down the corridors and doing our thing.

Or, just have this play when your patient pushes the button for the PCA.

If you could make a video, with this as background music, what would it have?

The writer is from the UK, so there are some phrases that are particular to that region. But nursing experiences are globally shared, apparently.

southernnurse347:

nurse-life:

WHEN MY PATIENT POOPS FOR THE FIRST TIME AFTER TAKING SOME GOLYTELY

I laughed way to hard at this!

So wrong, and yet so right.

southernnurse347:

nurse-life:

WHEN MY PATIENT POOPS FOR THE FIRST TIME AFTER TAKING SOME GOLYTELY

I laughed way to hard at this!

So wrong, and yet so right.

(via gauzeandeffect)

nursingisinmyblood:

ivanebeoulve:

adventuresintimeandspace:

Here are some scientific facts about blood loss for all you psychopaths writers out there.

yeah, for writting..

I need this guide for patient’s who think the little bit of blood they wiped means an emergency and I should immediately call for a rapid response right away! 

(via your-future-nurse)

(via pugglenurse)

After Oct. 1st, 2014, medical coders will be using the ICD-10 coding system for diagnoses and treatment.

This might not seem like it has much impact on a care provider (it does), but it will greatly expand the number of codes used in healthcare, research and reimbursement.

An example of one of the codes is “drowning and submersion due to falling or jumping from burning water-skis, initial encounter”; I’ve never heard of an episode of burning water skis. Although water skiing in north Texas was an unnerving experience when all I could think of was water moccasins.

This is a 3-page article, which may be a bit much reading for busy folks, but it may spark thinking about an abbreviation that you might hear (ICD-10) but not have much interaction with.

regionstraumapro:

You know the routine. Trauma patients get the usual ATLS primary survey secondary survey double play. An important part of the secondary survey is examining the back. Without it, you’ve failed to inspect nearly 50% of the body.

Usually this part is easy, especially if you’ve got a reasonably…

'The unit seems really quiet today !' …

hungoverstudentnurse:

Seconds later:

image

Never, ever, ever utter the ‘Q’ word.

Oh, never.

I wish that this wasn’t true, but it perfectly describes life for a while, now.

(Source: fassbander, via alittlenurse)

"We are very good at preparing to live, but not very good at living. We know how to sacrifice ten years for a diploma, and we are willing to work very hard to get a job, a car, a house, and so on. But we have difficulty remembering that we are alive in the present moment, the only moment there is for us to be alive"

Thich Nhat Hanh (via classicalconditioning)

Nurses:

  • checking breath sounds, but forgetting to take a deep breath
  • making sure patients follow nutritional guidelines, but ok with grabbing crackers and a swig of coffee for a meal (maybe; what’s a ‘meal’?) for ourselves
  • keeping bodily functions going on those around us, but doing “the 8 hour bladder-buster shift”
  • doing 4 things at once, all proficiently, and charting about them later, but having no concept of where time went
  • …….

I think I see a pattern here. Slowing down and being aware of the present is a mighty challenge.

(Source: divine-consciousness, via classicalconditioning)